Environmental Chemistry

ISSN 0254-6108

CN 11-1844/X

Vol. 38 No. 5
May  2019
Article Contents

Citation:

Effects of extracellular polymeric substances on the bioaccumulation of inorganic arsenic by green microalgae

  • Received Date: 2018-06-23
    Fund Project:

    Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21477103).

  • Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) self-produced by green algae influence its bio-purification of inorganic arsenic. Chlorella pyrenoidosa was chosen as the representative EPS-producing green algae to investigate bioaccumulative characteristics of inorganic arsenic and EPS effects, based on a 24 h short-term simulation exposure experiment to As(Ⅲ) and As(V). Results showed that the intracellular arsenic accumulation rate increased with the exposure concentration of As(Ⅲ) and As(V), and they matched well the Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction kinetic equation in the range of 0-40 mg·L-1. Increasing inorganic arsenic promoted the production of algae EPS, especially soluble EPS, and a significantly linear relationship was observed between EPS secretion rate and intracellular arsenic accumulation rate (R2 > 0.900). Compared to EPS-removed live cells, the maximum extracellular accumulation capacity of the intact algae cells for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) increased by 30.6% and 14.2%, while the maximum intracellular accumulation capacity reduced by 49.0% and 31.0%, respectively. The micro-interfacial interactions of algal EPS with inorganic arsenic impacts arsenic bioremediation.
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Effects of extracellular polymeric substances on the bioaccumulation of inorganic arsenic by green microalgae

  • 1. College of Environmental Science and Resources, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, 310058, China;
  • 2. Zhejiang Province Key Laboratory of Organic Pollution Process and Control, Hangzhou, 310058, China;
  • 3. National Demonstration Center for Experimental Environment and Resources Education(Zhejiang University), Hangzhou, 310058, China
Fund Project:  Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (21477103).

Abstract: Extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) self-produced by green algae influence its bio-purification of inorganic arsenic. Chlorella pyrenoidosa was chosen as the representative EPS-producing green algae to investigate bioaccumulative characteristics of inorganic arsenic and EPS effects, based on a 24 h short-term simulation exposure experiment to As(Ⅲ) and As(V). Results showed that the intracellular arsenic accumulation rate increased with the exposure concentration of As(Ⅲ) and As(V), and they matched well the Michaelis-Menten enzymatic reaction kinetic equation in the range of 0-40 mg·L-1. Increasing inorganic arsenic promoted the production of algae EPS, especially soluble EPS, and a significantly linear relationship was observed between EPS secretion rate and intracellular arsenic accumulation rate (R2 > 0.900). Compared to EPS-removed live cells, the maximum extracellular accumulation capacity of the intact algae cells for As(Ⅲ) and As(V) increased by 30.6% and 14.2%, while the maximum intracellular accumulation capacity reduced by 49.0% and 31.0%, respectively. The micro-interfacial interactions of algal EPS with inorganic arsenic impacts arsenic bioremediation.

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